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Leaked Blood Tests Reveal Massive Doping Suspicions In Distance Running


phart
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http://www.si.com/more-sports/2015/08/02/iaaf-doping-distance-running-scandal-leaked-blood-tests

The media outlets received 12,000 test results from 5,000 athletes and concluded that roughly one third of the medal winners in the highest-level distance events have recorded suspicious tests. A total of 146 Olympic and World Championships medals (including 55 gold medals) between 2001 and 2012 were won by runners who recorded suspicious tests.

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http://www.si.com/more-sports/2015/08/02/iaaf-doping-distance-running-scandal-leaked-blood-tests

The media outlets received 12,000 test results from 5,000 athletes and concluded that roughly one third of the medal winners in the highest-level distance events have recorded suspicious tests. A total of 146 Olympic and World Championships medals (including 55 gold medals) between 2001 and 2012 were won by runners who recorded suspicious tests.

I know you are quite well read on this sort of thing m8. What would constitute 'suspicious' and why wouldnt they be acted upon?

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I know you are quite well read on this sort of thing m8. What would constitute 'suspicious' and why wouldnt they be acted upon?

Covered up because it makes too many people too much money. Plus not wanting to deal with the backlash.

Hard to tell, could be anything from too high a hemocrit level, to incorrect ratios of various substances. Or the T/E thats the testosterone / epee-testosterone ratio. which is normally 1/1 they allow up to 4/1 before it triggers a suspension though. they could solve that problem by performing a carbon isotope test to see if there is any synthetic testosterone in the system. They can also check for plasticizers which might indicate blood transfusions. Also if you microdose EPO it only has a glow time of 8 hours but due to the lag between your body stopping it's own EPO and starting again between doses certain values can be suspicious, it's to do with reculytides or whatever the name is.

the easiest way to stop it is to get the producers to put a marker in the drugs so it can be seen, but they don't all do that, for unknown reasons. Speculation on them not doing it includes professional athletes can be used as test subjects for certain drugs.

Edited by phart
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Legalise the whole shebang and let the kunts get on with it.

then no country bar US, russia, China would win anything due to their huge pharma advantage linked with large population to find "hyper" responders to the drugs who would then outperform most folk.

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then no country bar US, russia, China would win anything due to their huge pharma advantage linked with large population to find "hyper" responders to the drugs who would then outperform most folk.

I wasn't being entirely serious in saying that it should all be legalised. It just seems that there is a massive problem in most top flight sports when it comes to pushing the boundaries and going beyond them in plenty of cases.

It is a non achievable goal to try to rid professional sport of drugs cheats, and i am sure that the authorities are well aware of it.

It seems, to me anyway, that it is a bit like computer programmers trying to keep ahead of hackers, with evermore intricate ways of breaking down the systems.

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I wasn't being entirely serious in saying that it should all be legalised. It just seems that there is a massive problem in most top flight sports when it comes to pushing the boundaries and going beyond them in plenty of cases.

It is a non achievable goal to try to rid professional sport of drugs cheats, and i am sure that the authorities are well aware of it.

It seems, to me anyway, that it is a bit like computer programmers trying to keep ahead of hackers, with evermore intricate ways of breaking down the systems.

I know sir :) countries already have training facility advantages etc already.

just get all drug makers to put markers in there, but they probably dont want people to be able to trace their drugs etc, or folk turning to underground labs. As you say humans are ingenious (enough anyway) to keep finding ways round shit.

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It's probably the case that even athletes who seek to stay within the rules nevertheless take any additives they can that bring them up to the legal limits. ..

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It's probably the case that even athletes who seek to stay within the rules nevertheless take any additives they can that bring them up to the legal limits. ..

Yeah thats exactly what happened with the 50% hematocrit level brought in to stop folk loading their blood with so much epo their heart could hardly pump it at rest rate.

Cyclists were actually having to wear heart monitors attached to an alarm that would go off and wake them when their heart beat slowed as their blood was so thick and they'd jump on a stationary bike and start working out to get it pumping again. Something like 8 cyclists all died of heart attacks.

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Not to mention blood transfusions going wrong. There is a bit in Tyler Hamilton's book where he tells of waking in the middle of the night and peeing blood :shocked:

Maybe the blood he took was contaminated, maybe it was mislabelled and he got someone else's instead of his own.

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Not to mention blood transfusions going wrong. There is a bit in Tyler Hamilton's book where he tells of waking in the middle of the night and peeing blood :shocked:

Maybe the blood he took was contaminated, maybe it was mislabelled and he got someone else's instead of his own.

Ricardo Ricco didn't chill his properly and ended up in A&E with kidney failure. Vinukorov got done for using his someone elses blood as well.

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Been hearing rumours since last weekend that there is a super-injunction in place to stop UK media revealing the name of the British runner who recorded 'off the chart' values on 3 occasions.

Probably be a few on here pleased if the rumours turn out to be true.

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Lord Coe has been too busy voting on NHS reform* to understand the science i think.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2015/08/05/uk-athletics-doping-scientists-idUKKCN0QA1DN20150805

* He hardly votes in the house of lords unless it's for private healthcare which he has interests in, but thats by the by for this, just another thing bugging me about Coe atm.

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Been hearing rumours since last weekend that there is a super-injunction in place to stop UK media revealing the name of the British runner who recorded 'off the chart' values on 3 occasions.

Probably be a few on here pleased if the rumours turn out to be true.

_61808558_radcliffe_epo2_640.jpg

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I see Mo Farah and 8 other athletes released their OFF scores, which is commendable but they need to release, the rate of change in Hemoglobin, hct% amd ret% (other blood values) to provide a working context , like producing the wattage without the time or weight.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/athletics/33867962

Looks like the IAAF have been shamed into acting - 28 athletes retrospectively banned from 2005 and 2007. All of them are inactive though (i.e. retired). So the next set of questions are

- Is this just a sop to try and dampen down the allegations (which will fail)

- Are there more to come for 2009, 2011, 2013

- who are they and are there medals involved

There are numerous athletes who won medals at these championships who have been banned at a later date, Tyson Gay and Justin Gatlin being two examples.

For this to have happened so rapidly after the revelations makes it look more and more like the IAAF was turning a blind eye to suspicious test results.

Edited by biffer
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You would think the IAAF would learn from what has happened in cycling. They are currently acting in a very similar manner to what the UCI did for many years. And they now look terrible.

Perhaps many years of being able to cover up mass doping gives them the idea that they can continue to do this indefinitely. But you know that it will all come out sooner or later. Far better to own up to the problems, and make a show of addressing it. From a PR point of view I cannot believe that they don't see this as the most sensible option.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/athletics/33867962

Looks like the IAAF have been shamed into acting - 28 athletes retrospectively banned from 2005 and 2007. All of them are inactive though (i.e. retired). So the next set of questions are

- Is this just a sop to try and dampen down the allegations (which will fail)

- Are there more to come for 2009, 2011, 2013

- who are they and are there medals involved

There are numerous athletes who won medals at these championships who have been banned at a later date, Tyson Gay and Justin Gatlin being two examples.

For this to have happened so rapidly after the revelations makes it look more and more like the IAAF was turning a blind eye to suspicious test results.

Head in sand stuff from the government, we're no different from any other nation.

"UK Anti-Doping is 'best in world'

Sports Minister Tracey Crouch told BBC Sport that she is confident the British athletics scene is "clean".

Speaking to Test Match Special during the Women's Ashes Test between England and Australia, Crouch said: "I'm confident that British athletes undergo such rigorous testing that hopefully, despite some of the allegations, none of our athletes will be caught up in it.

"The UK anti-doping agency is one of the best, if not the best, in the world.""

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Paula Radcliffe has just come out and said that giving blood data is too complex and athletes should not do it. Hmmmmmm! Is this good advice or smokescreenery?

:wave:

Oh dear.

Numbers are obviously highly suspicous. Release the numbers and you are stuffed. Say that you won't release the numbers because everyone is too stupid to understand and you are stuffed. But keep your BBC job for the moment.

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If it's too complicated to understand why are athletes allowing sanctions to be imposed off the back of the data. Michael Ashenden probably understands the data as well as any human who has ever lived. Surely it is cool to give it to him, instead of smearing him as a "so called expert" by now the head of the IAAF Seb Coe.

The lack of transparency in the first place and no will to chase drug cheats (fast times make money), can't have everyone going back to 10.04 and the occasional sub 10 100 metres.

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