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Best of all, says Lintott, it’s easy to revel in the celestial fireworks: just wrap up warm, let your eyes adjust to the dark and look up. “My favourite thing about meteor watching is that the only equipment you really need is a comfortable chair,” he said.

That's the sort of participation event that appeals to me now.

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Saw loads. Conditions were perfect, clear skies and a Saturday night

Was at a house party so we just sat in the garden til 3am with beers and a roaring fire  :beer2:

 

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No shooting stars tonight, but just looking up is amazing on a frosty clear night. Just got to make it to the 22nd of Dec with a bit of  a celebration and we can welcome the return of the Sun.

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22 minutes ago, Eisegerwind said:

Just got to make it to the 22nd of Dec with a bit of  a celebration and we can welcome the return of the Sun.

It's ok you only need to wait another 5 hours or so ;) 

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Donkey's years ago, I used to do meteor watches up at Huddersfield observatory to send the data to some organisation or other that used to collect it (magnitude, direction, angular distance, that sort of stuff). I was always so taken by the beauty of the things that I generally forgot to write down what I'd seen. I used to think to myself that after billions of years roaming around the solar system, it just so happened that I was there to watch its final moments. That's probably why I was never going to end up a scientist, but to this day I'm always made up when I see one.

On a slightly separate matter, did anyone see the conjunction of Jupiter & Venus the other morning? It looked spectacular hanging over the Pennine horizon around 6.45am.

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7 minutes ago, Huddersfield said:

Donkey's years ago, I used to do meteor watches up at Huddersfield observatory to send the data to some organisation or other that used to collect it (magnitude, direction, angular distance, that sort of stuff). I was always so taken by the beauty of the things that I generally forgot to write down what I'd seen. I used to think to myself that after billions of years roaming around the solar system, it just so happened that I was there to watch its final moments. That's probably why I was never going to end up a scientist, but to this day I'm always made up when I see one.

On a slightly separate matter, did anyone see the conjunction of Jupiter & Venus the other morning? It looked spectacular hanging over the Pennine horizon around 6.45am.

I couldn't get down to the Pennines to see it.;)

Did you also get the crescent moon just above them?

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8 minutes ago, Orraloon said:

I couldn't get down to the Pennines to see it.;)

Did you also get the crescent moon just above them?

No - I think the Moon was following (although my memory ain't what it was) so I just got the pair of them sat nicely together in the dawn light.

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4 minutes ago, Huddersfield said:

No - I think the Moon was following (although my memory ain't what it was) so I just got the pair of them sat nicely together in the dawn light.

At the start of the week the moon was quite far away (higher in the sky) from them but got closer with a smaller crescent as the week went on. Mars is also in the same area but much fainter than Jupiter and Venus.

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21 hours ago, Orraloon said:

At the start of the week the moon was quite far away (higher in the sky) from them but got closer with a smaller crescent as the week went on. Mars is also in the same area but much fainter than Jupiter and Venus.

I just checked a star chart to see what was happening & the Moon had just passed below of the pair, so at the time I looked, it was just below the horizon. It's a shame that, as I'd have loved to see the three together & would have done about 10 minutes later.

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If the sky is clear, today is a good chance to see the ISS. Look to the SSW about 1650 and it will be visible heading across the sky for about 4 minutes. Then it comes back round again at 1826. 

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38 minutes ago, Toepoke said:

Got a great view of the setting supermoon earlier. Mad how it looks much bigger when it's closer to the horizon...

 

 

Good shout last night, I came on and saw your post so reminded me to go and have a look.

Atmospheric refraction. As you say if you don't know of the phenomenon it produces some wild sights.

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